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Overweight and Pregnancy


Have you ever wondered how overweight is associated with pregnancy complications? It is known that obesity makes pregnancy more difficult for women. Overweight women are less likely to get pregnant, and if they do, they risk having complications during pregnancy and affecting the baby after birth. Among the harmful effects of obesity during pregnancy are gestational diabetes, pre-eclampsia (a hypertensive disorder that occurs when a pregnant woman develops high blood pressure), and ecampsia (a complication characterized by convulsions that usually follows after the onset of pre-eclampsia). In addition, many overweight women are hospitalized during pregnancy. It is estimated that an overweight woman is four times more prone to require hospitalization.

What's more, perinatal mortality and birth defects are more common when overweight is present. The risk of high birthweight in babies born from obese women is higher. Mothers also present more cases of low blood sugar and Cesarean section delivery. Birth defects such as spina bifida and other brain, heart, and digestive system defects are also more common in infants born from overweight mothers. These women are at a higher risk of having babies with omphalocele, a type of defect in the muscles of the abdominal wall that makes the intestines and liver stay outside the abdomen.

You should monitor your weight at all times and take the actions needed even during pregnancy and in the postpartum period. It is normal for women to gain weight during this process, but an excess of weight can badly influence pregnancy and the infant.


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